Program

DAILY SCHEDULE

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13
3:30PM Conference registration begins (continues until 7:30PM)
Corwin Pavilion Lobby
6-7:30PM

Welcome Dinner
Corwin Pavilion

Richard Appelbaum and Barbara Herr Harthorn

8-9PM Keynote Address
Campbell Hall

Nicholas Kristof

Nicholas Kristof

Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times Columnist

A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunity
Books will be available for purchase and signing.

Tickets to this event are included with full registration only. To buy tickets separately, contact UCSB Arts & Lectures.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14
8-8:30AM

Conference registration, breakfast
Corwin Pavilion Lobby

8:30-8:45AM

Welcome and Conference Overview
Corwin Pavilion

Barbara Herr Harthorn (include introduction for opening plenary speakers)

8:45-9:45AM

Opening plenary: Assessing Risks and Promises of New Technologies
Corwin Pavilion

Moderator: Richard Appelbaum

How Advancing Technologies Are Making It Possible to Solve Humanity's Grand Challenges--Create New Nightmares.
Vivek Wadhwa, Fellow at Arthur & Toni Rembe Rock Center for Corporate Governance, Stanford University; Director of Research at the Center for Entrepreneurship and Research Commercialization at the Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University; and Distinguished Fellow at Singularity University

Understanding and Determining Product Safety: Who Decides and How?
Elizabeth Grossman, journalist and author of Chasing Molecules: Poisonous Products, Human Health, and the Promise of Green Chemistry and High Tech Trash: Digital Devices, Hidden Toxics, and Human Health

 

9:45-10AM Break
Corwin Pavilion
10-11:30AM

Concurrent sessions 1 - Assessing Risks and Promises of New Technologies

1.1 – People, Water, and Energy: A Panel
Santa Barbara Harbor Room

Chair and Moderator: Patricia Holden

Katie Davis, Santa Barbara County Water Guardians

Linsey Shariq, PhD Candidate and Floyd and Mary Schwall Fellow, Department of Environmental Engineering, University of California, Davis

Larry Siegel, Director, Safe Water International

1.2 – Advocating Equitable and Sustainable Outcomes of Emerging Technologies
State Street Room

The Challenges and Opportunities of NGO Networks for the Regulation of Nanotechnologies
David Azoulay, Managing Attorney, Center for International Environmental Law

Collaborating with Civil Society Organizations: The Case of ReLANS
Edgar Záyago Lau, Professor, Autonomous University of Zacatecas; Technical Secretary, Latin American Nanotechnology & Society Network (ReLANS) (Presentation co-author: Guillermo Foladori, Professor, Autonomous University of Zacatecas; Executive Director, ReLANS)

Seeing the World Through (Technology) Solutions: How to Match the World's Exponentially Growing Demand for Solutions
Romanus Berg, CIO, Ashoka - Innovators for the Public

1.3 – Linking Technologies and Societal Needs
Corwin Pavilion

José Gómez-Márquez, Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD), International Design Center and D-Lab instructor at MIT

Sheila Davis, Executive Director, Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition

NGOs' Support of Appropriate Technologies in Africa
Moses Kizza Musaazi, Senior Lecturer, Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Makerere University; Founder, Technology for Tomorrow Ltd.

11:40-12:15PM Plenary: Group report-back to review morning session outcomes
Corwin Pavilion
12:15-1:15PM Poster Presentations and Lunch
Corwin Pavilion
1:15-2:15PM

Plenary - Does Better Technology Make Stronger Democracy?
Corwin Pavilion

Thomas Tighe, President and CEO, Direct Relief

ICTs and Democratization: Material Challenges
Lisa Parks, Professor of Film and Media Studies and Director of the Center for Information Technology in Society, University of California, Santa Barbara

2:15-3:30PM

Concurrent Sessions 2 - Does Better Technology Make Stronger Democracy?

2.1 – Working Upstream: Nanotechnology, Synthetic Biology, and NGO Influence in Governance
Corwin Pavilion

Engaging NGOs in Nanotechnology: Perspectives from the Early Days
Kristen Kulinowski, Research Staff Member, US Science and Technology Policy Institute

Engagement @ the Technological Frontier: New Approaches to Governance from the NGO Community (as a DIYbio Perspective)
Todd Kuiken, Senior Program Associate, Science and Technology Innovation Program, Woodrow Wilson Center

Speaker TBD

2.2 – New Media and NGO Organizing: Opportunity, Efficacy, and Risk
State Street Room

Worker-NGO Unity in China
Jenny Chan, Lecturer of Contemporary Chinese Studies, School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies, University of Oxford

From Ladders to Distributions: Understanding the Role of Low Cost Participation Engagement
Jennifer Earl, Professor of Sociology, University of Arizona

Anonymity and Accountability: How Privacy Enables NGO Work
Karen Reilly, Development Director, The Tor Project

2.3 – Creating Safe Space: Leveraging GIS for Human Health and the Environment
Santa Barbara Harbor Room

Where is Humanitarian Space?
Andrew Schroeder, Director of Research and Analysis, Direct Relief

Boundary Organizations Pushing the Frontier of Spatially Explicit and Collaborative Decision-Making about the Environment
John Gallo, Senior Scientist, Conservation Biology Institute

Speaker TBD

3:30-3:45PM Break
Corwin Pavilion
3:45-4:15PM Plenary: Group report-back to review afternoon session outcomes and the next day’s program
Corwin Pavilion
4:15-5:15PM

Plenary Panel: Meeting NGO Workforce Needs
Corwin Pavilion

Moderator: Geoff Green, Executive Director, The Fund for Santa Barbara

David Azoulay, Managing Attorney, Center for International Environmental Law

Moses Kizza Musaazi, Founder, Technology for Tomorrow, Ltd.

Andrew Schroeder, Director of Research and Analysis, Direct Relief International

5:30-5:45PM Break
5:45-7:00PM

NGO Marketplace and Reception
Corwin Pavilion

Learn about the exciting work of our NGO conference participants! NGO representatives will be hosting tables to showcase their current projects and past achievements. Students with an interest in working for nonprofits are welcome to meet with our invited guests to learn about opportunities and what it’s like to work in the nonprofit sector.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 15
8-8:30AM Conference registration, breakfast
Corwin Pavilion
8:30-9:30AM

Plenary – Defining and Achieving Social Responsibility
Corwin Pavilion

Between Innovation, Creativity and Routine: Non-Governmental Organizations in the Twenty-first Century
David Lewis, Professor of Social Policy and Development, London School of Economics and Political Science

Emancipating Transformations: From Technology Policy to Innovation Democracy
Andy Stirling, Professor of Science and Technology Policy, University of Sussex

9:30AM-11AM

Concurrent Sessions 3 Defining and Achieving Social Responsibility

3.1 – Worker Representation in the Fast-Changing Workplace: The Role of Unions in Responsible Development
State Street Room

Workers' Concerns on Nanotechnology EHS Issues and the Regulation Agenda
Noela Invernizzi, Professor of Anthropology, Education and Public Policy Programs, Federal University of Parana

Unions and Potentially Hazardous Technologies: From the Shop Floor to the Halls of Congress
Darius Sivin, Health and Safety Department, International Union, UAW

Aida Ponce del Castillo, Senior Researcher, European Trade Union Institute

3.2 – Does Corporate Social Responsibility Guarantee Workers' Rights?
Santa Barbara Harbor Room

Making Blue the Next Green: Achieving Worker's rights in the Global Economy
Richard Appelbaum, MacArthur Chair of Global and International Studies, Professor of Sociology, and Research Group Leader at the Center for Nanotechnology in Society, University of California, Santa Barbara

Can Mobile Deepen the Impact of CSR? Leveraging Mobile to Give Voice to the Global Workforce
Heather Franzese, Co-Founder and Director of Good World Solutions and Labor Link

Scott Nova, Executive Director, Worker Rights Consortium

3.3 – NGO-Government Interactions: Government Perspectives
Corwin Pavilion

Rachel Parker, Senior Research Advisor, US Agency for International Development

Flávio Plentz, General Coordinator, Micro and Nanotechnology Department, Brazilian Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation

Speaker TBD

11-11:15AM Break
Corwin Pavilion
11:15-11:45AM Plenary – Group report-back to review morning session outcomes
Corwin Pavilion
11:45AM-12:45PM Lunch
Corwin Pavilion
12:45-2:45PM

Closing Plenary – Responsible Development, Responsible Innovation: Global Governance of New Technologies
Corwin Pavilion

Moderators: Richard Appelbaum and Barbara Herr Harthorn

Peter Asaro, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Programs at The New School; Co-Founder and Vice-Chair of the International Committee for Robot Arms Control; and Spokesperson for the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots

Jennifer Kuzma, Goodnight-NCGSK Foundation Distinguished Professor in the School of Public and International Affairs and co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society center, North Carolina State University

Chris Newfield, Professor of Literature and American Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara

Simone Pulver, Associate Professor of Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara

Tarun Wadhwa, Researcher at the Hybrid Reality Institute and author of Identified: Why They Are Getting to Know Everything about Us

2:45-3:15PM

Concluding Remarks
Corwin Pavilion

Richard Appelbaum, Barbara Herr Harthorn, and Cassandra Engeman

Keynote Speaker

Nicholas Kristof

Nicholas Kristof

Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times Columnist

“He is, in his commitment to the fundamental ideals of news reporting, comparable to the great [Edward R.] Murrow.” Today
A Path Appears cover

A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunity
THU, NOV 13 / 8 PM / CAMPBELL HALL

A two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter and columnist for The New York Times, Nicholas Kristof is an extraordinary thinker, human rights advocate and chronicler of humanity. A Path Appears, his galvanizing new book with Sheryl WuDunn (with whom he also wrote Half the Sky), shines a light on global game changers. Using scrupulous research and reportage, he examines the success of domestic and global aid initiatives and the effectiveness of specific approaches to giving, offering practical advice on the best ways each of us can make a difference.
 
Books will be available for purchase and signing
 
Presented by UCSB Arts & Lectures in conjunction with the UCSB Center for Nanotechnology in Society conference, “Democratizing Technologies: Assessing the Role of NGOs in Shaping Technological Futures”